Transportation

Transportation

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Getting Around New Zealand

New Zealand has good air, train and bus links, schedules are available at most Information Centres.

Driving

Driving in New Zealand is usually easy. Roads are good, congestion is low, speeding is not common and drunk driving incurs heavy penalties. However city traffic can be heavy, especially in ‘rush hours’ on the Auckland and Wellington motorways. Most ‘State Highways’ throughout the country are not large by overseas standards, many only have 2 lanes. Rural roads require special care, because many are winding, some have a gravel or ‘metalled’ surface and you need to be aware of livestock that may be on the road.

Driver Licenses

All drivers need a driver licence. You can be fined if you do not have your licence when stopped by the Police so you should always carry your licence with you when you drive. If you have a driver licence in your home country or an international driving permit or driver licence, you can drive in New Zealand. However you will need to apply for a New Zealand driver licence and pass an eyesight examination, as well as a driving theory and practical test within 12 months of arrival in New Zealand.

Driving Rules

The road code in New Zealand is similar to that in most Western countries, but there are a few important features that need to be noted in advance of your arrival.

Keep Left! New Zealanders drive on the left side of the road. This is easy to forget when you first arrive, as old habits die hard, but such lapses can be fatal. KEEP LEFT AT ALL TIMES!

Speed Limits

Towns and cities have speed limits of 50 kilometers per hour and the open road is 100 kilometres per hour.

Safety Belts

All people in a car (in the front and rear seats) must wear safety belts at all times. If you are driving a car, you are responsible for ensuring that all children less than 5 years old are restrained in an approved child seat. They only exception is when you are travelling in a taxi. If the taxi has no restraint available the child must sit in the back seat.

Safety Helmets

Safety helmets are compulsory for all cyclists and motorcyclists. This includes passengers and children being carried on bicycles. The helmets must conform to the New Zealand Standard and be securely fastened. Approved safety helmets can be purchased from cycle shops. A fine is imposed if a cyclist is caught cycling without a helmet.
By | 2016-11-26T18:58:22+00:00 February 5th, 2014|Lifestyle|0 Comments

About the Author:

Danny de Hek

Like most people, I have many passions, goals and dreams. As a self made business professional, my focus is helping my clients, associates and friends, build, strengthen and maintain their success. It would be fair to say I am in the full time business of building relationships and feel my purpose and skill is connecting the right people with the right people.

My professional work tends to dominate my personal life, to the horror of my partner and business mentor. They both fully support me yet give me the hard truths when I need to hear this. I am always investing in my personal development to have a fulfilled work/life balance. I enjoy Target Shooting, Hiking & Mountain Biking to clear the brain and to take the guilt away when indulging at a quirky cafe for a cooked breakfast or brunch.

My passion for travelling has seen me experience the world on many occasions, my next adventure will be doing the Tibet Rail Journey on the Qinghai-Tibet Railway from Lhasa to Golmud as long as they have Wi-Fi aboard ;-) I have many goals I still wish to achieve but am pretty chuffed that I have accomplished so many of these already.

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